Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Much pondering is called for

on this article from The Atlantic.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/02/eating-toward-immortality/515658/

My first reaction is that I am much closer to the
“the omnivore’s fun time at the supermarket”
than I am to the omnivore's dilemma, even though I do have certain values which guide my food choices.

My second thought is that dietary rigidity, when seen as a path to salvation and escape from disease and death, is really a form of idolatry.

I also wonder why this article, from February, just showed up in my Facebook feed today. Is it too challenging to too many of us to have made the rounds any quicker than that?


Thursday, February 23, 2017

While looking for possible handouts on food waste

I ran across this
which is kind of fun.

I just wish I knew
how to make it bigger.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

An interesting development

Now here's a helpful example of alternative facts; that is, actual facts that challenge food industry manipulated nutritional information. Facts as an alternative to misinformation. How about that!

https://www.feedthetruth.org/#truth-transparency-integrity

A story in FERN this week reports that the founder of KIND, Daniel Lubetzky, who's funding this is creating a kind of blind trust, leaving the direction of the site to a board of notable nutrition scientists.

Think of it as the Antisugar. Or the food biz's Antitrump.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

A School Lunch Hero

and a good summary of the history and issues of school lunch policies.
http://highline.huffingtonpost.com/articles/en/school-lunch/

I've been on Facebook a little too much, but this story is too long and too complex to share there. It's information is a good preparation for countering whatever selfish bunkum the current Republican administration throws at us.

This article reminded me that on the things we care deeply about - such as all our school children having access to wholesome food - we need to be prepared with facts and good examples of what works. It also underscores the importance of working locally with day-to-day doggedness to achieve our goals, not focusing on celebrity initiatives.


Sunday, November 27, 2016

Not glamorous, perhaps, but extremely important

Here is a great example of the difference simple improvements in small scale sustainable agriculture can make. It's also a wonderful story of selective seed saving, and how it can make a difference in a few generations locally, without benefit of a research lab and expensive technologies.
https://closeup.oxfamamerica.org/stories/seeds-success

This link came in an Oxfam newsletter.

Meanwhile, I've used a chunk of time this weekend to catch up with following many links on food waste, a current topic of great interest here in Sonoma County. I plan to post some of them with notes and/or reflections during Advent.

What did you do with your Thanksgiving leftovers? How do you plan to prevent or repurpose holiday excess this Advent and Christmas?

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Someone's spamming

with comments - appearing to be ads when I translate them - about some water related technology in Riyadh. I have no idea how to stop this except to report them as spam. I have now reported five such in a matter of minutes, and I expect there to be more when I check my email again.

If I knew how to say "Stop the spammy comments!" in Arabic I would.

If anyone reads this and has any bright ideas, post a comment and I will read it and post it if it is helpful.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Rural food deserts

So much attention gets paid to urban core food deserts, but this series from Utah Public Radio points up the tragedy of a broken food system on the Navajo reservation.

http://upr.org/post/planting-seeds-health-navajo-nation

Check out both segments of the story.

One thing I didn't see here: to what extent did the former commodity food program contribute to the breakdown of old ways of producing food?